Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Leprechaun Zombie

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! I better get some green on before I get pinched! My pal Sam made me an early St. Pat’s Day dinner a few days ago: good ol’ corned beef and cabbage.

Love and shamrocks to everyone! Convention season is almost upon us! First up: WonderCon in San Francisco.

7 Responses to “Happy St. Patrick’s Day!”

  1. Rick Catizone says:

    Really nice…..altho’ I might have preferred to see a happier non-zombie leprechaun….another great image….

    A more opaque style than most of your other illustrations, and you handle it with such ease….

    Best,
    Rick

  2. Rick Tucker says:

    That’s a very happy looking zombie Leprechaun, very satisfied! I guess that’s the difference between regular zombies and the zombies in the ranks of mythic folk.
    I’m not a fan of zombies (been done to death.. get it?) but I have to say these fully rendered and kitschy themes are a lot of fun. I’m also loving the calendar and look forward to next year’s.

    Tucker

  3. Aaron says:

    Ah, ’tis the pot o’ brains at the end of the rainbow begora!
    Even though I’m not a zombie fan I do like this one.
    Reminds me of a gahan wilson cartoon that shows a guy making a mad dash for the pot of gold. The two grinning leprechauns are standing on a pile of human bones.
    Maybe next year you could try a banshee, mr. stout, an Irish beastie that seems to be up for some free artistic interpretation.

  4. Bill says:

    Hi,
    Lee Copeland placed a comment and asked a question regarding size and media. For some reason his question (and my answer) weren’t posted here but on some strange offshoot of this page.

    Anyway, here’s what Lee wrote (and my response):

    Bill, nice attention to detail with the four leaf clovers in the grass. May I ask what size the original painting is and did you use water soluble oils on this piece?

    Hi Lee,
    24″ x 18″, (alkyd) oil on canvas.

    I hear too many complaints about water soluble oils to use them. I’ve been using alkyds for decades. They’re fast drying oil paints with all of the advantages of both oils and acrylics but none of the disadvantages of either (great blending capabilities plus they dry exactly the same value and color as you see them when you first put them down — not darker like acrylics nor lighter like gouache). Their quick drying speed allows me to crank these babies out. FYI, I use 50% turpentine and 50% Liquin as my medium.

  5. Benjamin says:

    This has nothing to do with zombies or Irish fairy folk, so my apologies.

    I don’t know if you read the dinosaur mailing list, but Gregory S. Paul has been making some statements about paleoart that has been making some waves in that tiny community. I’m not looking for bad-mouthing or drama, but I was wondering if you had any opinions on what he was saying.

    Mainly, if you haven’t read, he was asking for paleoartists to come together to agree on fair prices and for younger artists to stop undercutting the deserved asking prince for work by established dinosaur artists. He thought it might be good for there to be a website or on-line community where dinosaur artists could get together and share ideas, news, and publishing stories. (The flame wars started when he asked that people stop making skeletal reconstructions that look like his, and made some opinionated statements about his work compared to those of classic artists like Knight, Burian, Zallinger, and his current contemporaries.)

    As a person who’s been working in that field for about 3 decades—not to mention the ultra competitive fields of illustration and film—I was wondering if you had any thoughts.

  6. Bill says:

    I have such mixed feelings about all of this. On the one hand, I’m a strong believer in copyright and that Greg’s work should be protected. You can’t copyright style, however. If you could, then the thousands of artists who imitated Frank Frazetta…well, you get the picture.

    I would also love to see some standards regarding pricing and content. That ain’t gonna happen, either, as artists (business-wise, anyway) seem to be their own worst enemies. Organizing them into a Guild or similar organization would be like herding cats and I’ll bet they’d still find ways to undercut each other.

    As a production designer in the film world I’m a member of the Art Directors Union. I’m also in the Writers Guild of America. One of those organizations I see as absolutely worthless to its members. The other one is terrific. Guess which is which.

    And who would decide who gets to be in the Guild? Would artists that produce pictures or sculpture that exhibit Good Science but also produce, quite frankly, crappy art be allowed in the organization? Conversely, would outstanding artists whose research is not up-to-snuff be allowed as members? My fear is that such a group would quickly become a clique-y little group rife with personal politics.

    As you can see, this whole thing is a big can of worms. I do what I can, giving free lectures to artists on negotiation and artists rights — at least so they know the value of what they’re so ready to foolishly give up to get the job or seem like a Nice Guy — but one person can only do so much.

    I like Greg’s idea for an online discussion forum. It would be a way of spreading what I’ve learned to people I can’t reach in person.

  7. kiraak says:

    I would also love to see some standards regarding pricing and content. That ain’t gonna happen, either, as artists (business-wise, anyway) seem to be their own worst enemies.

    Mainly, if you haven’t read, he was asking for paleoartists to come together to agree on fair prices and for younger artists to stop undercutting the deserved asking prince for work by established dinosaur artists.
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