18 Tips for Comic Book Artists by Jean “Moebius” Giraud #15

Jean Giraud, circa the first time we met, many decades ago.

“I started in 1957 when I sold my first story to a magazine.”

— Jean Giraud

15) At the beginning of an artist’s career, he should principally involve himself in the creation of very high quality short stories.

Humble (but promising) beginnings: early western comics page by Giraud. His early self-penned comics exhibited a tendency to overwrite. He sure cured himself of that with Arzak!

He has a better chance (than with long format stories) of successfully completing them, while maintaining a high standard of quality.

It's better to start small...

...than to attempt something overly ambitious and far beyond your capabilities.

It will also be easier to place them in a book or sell them to a publisher.

Never forget to consider the business end of being an artist.

Two master storytellers: Moebius and Will Eisner.

Once this short form has been mastered to some extent, then the artist can feel free to move on to a longer form with some degree of confidence in his or her storytelling skills.

Moebius thumbnail layouts for an Arzak story.

Moebius once asked this about his stories:
“What do they whisper? Words of love, family stories? Are they in business? It’s a mystery, the beginning of a novel … This scene that I draw, almost hiding, excites my imagination.”

Giraud was a master of both short form and long form comics storytelling. Here’s a two-pager by Jean:

Study it. There’s more here than first meets the eye.

Next: Man Up

To easily access this entire series, go to:

http://xurxogpenalta.tumblr.com/post/91539965160/artist-william-stout-has-gone-through-the-moebius

2 Responses to “18 Tips for Comic Book Artists by Jean “Moebius” Giraud #15”

  1. Charles Klein says:

    Thanks for posting this. I love Giraud’s art. I used to buy Heavy Metal, every time an issue had something by him. Now that he’s gone, and his printed works have gone stratospheric in price, I have to glean what I can from the ‘net. I was delighted to see the nude b/w photos he used for reference with the faun in “Ballade.” I am very happy to have found this location.

    I have lost a hero, but found a bit of his legacy here. There is only a taste of him in the Illustrators’ Biographies site (Vadeboncoeur), and I often root around on the web for as much as I can fine.

  2. Charles Klein says:

    Thanks for posting this. I love Giraud’s art. I used to buy Heavy Metal, every time an issue had something by him. Now that he’s gone, and his printed works have gone stratospheric in price, I have to glean what I can from the ‘net. I was delighted to see the nude b/w photos he used for reference with the faun in “Ballade.” I am very happy to have found this location.

    I have lost a hero, but found a bit of his legacy here. There is only a taste of him in the Illustrators’ Biographies site (Vadeboncoeur), and I often root around on the web for as much as I can find.

Leave a Reply