Charles Livingston Bull and other Artists I like

This entry is an edited response to an inquiry by a friend of mine who is a fellow collector of Charles Livingston Bull magazine covers. I thought I

5 Responses to “Charles Livingston Bull and other Artists I like”

  1. Aaron says:

    Great list of artists and now I have to check out Charles Livingston Bull. Can’t promise that I won’t be bidding against you on e-bay, but probably not. Still desperately trying to save for Frazetta art and sometimes bidding on your own pieces.
    I realize your list was not exhaustive but I wondered if you had any Reed Crandall pieces in your collection? Also, what do you have by Angelo Torres? My own favorite wildlife artist, and her prints pretty much take up the space of our walls here in Tokyo, is Bev Doolittle. Believe you said sometime back that you’d met her. I’m envious.
    Best,
    Aaron

  2. Craig says:

    Until you start bidding on your own art I probably won’t be bidding against you.
    I have your Charles Knight sketchbooks and several nice Frazetta retrospectives but I’m not that familiar with most of the other wildlife artists you mention. Let me know if there are any retrospective books or collections featuring these artists you can recommend that are currently available or might be found on Ebay.
    Thanks,
    Craig

  3. William Stout says:

    Hi Aaron,
    Yes, I do have a nice Reed Crandall Barsoomian ink drawing. As far as Angelo Torres, I have my favorite CREEPY page of his plus several great pages (I’d sure like to get the rest!) from the prehistoric life Classics Illustrated comic he did (plus a page or two by Al Williamson from that same book).

    I met Bev Doolittle while I was exhibiting at the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show. It turns out she’s a big dinosaur fan. She showed me photos of a wrought iron fence she had made for the perimeter of her property in the form of dinosaur ribs and vertebrae!

    Hi Craig,
    On seeing work by the other wildlife artists I mentioned:
    For Charles Livingston Bull and Paul Bransom, pick up The Saturday Evening Post Animal Book from the Curtis Publishing Company (1978). It shouldn’t be too hard to find. It’s loaded with their work.

    There are several easily obtainable books out on the great Bob Kuhn, several on Robert Bateman, a couple each on Carl Rungius and German wildlife painter Wilhelm Kuhnert, as well as one on Antoine Louis Barye (I believe it’s published by the Antique Collectors Society). Baltimore, MD is Barye heaven. It was the home of two competing Barye collectors. Their collections are at the Walters Art Gallery and the Baltimore Museum of Art. Plus, there’s a small Barye park in Baltimore.

    There was a great article on Stanley Meltzoff in a recent issue of Illustration. Stuart Ng books is a good source for Swedish books on Bruno Liljefors (there’s been at least one US book on him, too).

    As far as Paul Jouve and Henri Deluermoz, well, that will be difficult and expensive (especially Jouve, whose illustrated books were printed by the finest printer in the world on handmade paper in editions that rarely went over 200. You’ll be competing with very well-heeled collectors and universities. Plus, sometimes the elaborate bindings can be worth more than the book. Most of Jouve’s books now are in the $6000 – $10,000 range — each.). I’m thinking about reprinting some of their work myself just so more of us poor common folk can share in their splendid visions.

    Happy Hunting!

  4. bruce gordon says:

    i have what i believe to be the original painting of a “leopard with red bird kill”. It was given to me by my great aunt who was married to Daniel J. Singer. Dan singer wrote a book with Edmund Heller about big game hunting in south america.Tthe book was published around 1912 and this painting is the frontspiece for the book.
    Does anyone have any information about this painting? value,and anything about dan singer). thanx , bruce

  5. Bill says:

    Hi Bruce,
    E-mail me a jpeg of the picture. I’ll try to identify the artist. I know that Charles R. Knight painted a magnificent picture of a leopard bringing a dead flamingo to its cubs.
    —Bill

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